Monday, May 25, 2020

The Effects Of Conflict On The Workplace - 887 Words

Conflict in the workplace is something that’s been going on for centuries. Although we think of conflict as negative, it can also have a positive impact. In this paper we will look at both the negative and positive impact of conflict in the workplace. Conflict is opposition or antagonism toward other individuals or things (Hegar, Human Relations at Work, pg 480). For example, if your co-worker was given an award for outstanding work performance but you feel that you were more deserving of the award. Now there is a conflict between you two. Even if you do feel like you are more deserving, you should still try and keep that to yourself and get your work done. Holding that type of animosity just creates more conflict. Two types of conflict that are important in human relations are conflict at the individual level and conflict at the organizational level. When needs of individuals are at odds conflict can develop. The reasons for this are frustration and interpersonal conflict. Some of our biggest frustrations come from the workplace. It may be because we feel that our work in unfulfilling, co-workers that we don’t get along with demanding structures within the organization that seem to micromanage us. In most instances we feel that our options for real fulfillment at work are limited which creates conflict inside us. Intrapersonal conflict occurs when a person or group of people frustrates or interferes with another person’s efforts at achieving a goal (Hegar, Human RelationsShow MoreRelatedConflict And Its Effects On The Workplace1825 Words   |  8 PagesIntroduction Conflict is inevitable when participating in day-to-day operations in groups, the workplace, and in life. How one approaches these conflicts can ultimately lead to the success or failure in ones professional, social or academic life. According to our class textbook, â€Å"Organizational Behavior,† conflict is when one party perceives that its interests are being opposed or negatively affected by another party. Sources of conflict can be real or imagined and there are multiple causes forRead MoreConflict And Its Effects On The Workplace Essay1414 Words   |  6 PagesIntroduction Conflict is the process in which one team perceives that his or her interests are being opposed or negatively affected by another party. Many years ago, conflict was viewed as undesirable and counterproductive. There is evidence that conflict can produce undesirable outcomes such as lower job satisfaction, team cohesion, and knowledge sharing as well as higher organizational politics and turn-over. However, experts later formed the opinion that organizations suffer from too little asRead MoreConflict Between Interpersonal, Intra Groups And Intra Group Levels1503 Words   |  7 PagesIn the contention of viewing conflict as whether undesirable phenomenon or not, it has been widely accepted that the presence of conflict in the workplace is inevitable. According to Rahim (2002, p. 207), conflict could be define as â€Å"an interactive process manifested in incompatibility, disagreement, or dissonance within or between social entities.† As this conflict occurs in the workplace, t he existence of conflict is not only limited between people in an organisation, but it is also occurred betweenRead MoreThe Impact Of A Poor Communication Climate On The Workplace Essay951 Words   |  4 Pages The literature review will consist of theoretical perspectives and previous research findings related to the communication climate in the workplace. The review will provide a focus for the study and to report the important concepts and data related to the attitudes and behaviors in the workplace. The review will include an overview of the behaviors, conflict resolution, and educating leadership on communication strategies. A variety of resources will be utilized for reviews of literature pertinentRead MoreRecommendation On The Training Offer1113 Words   |  5 Pagesmust be high for it to have a positive effect Based on the above analysis, I recommend to select / reject this training offer. Kind regards, Thien Tuc Nguyen Assessment Task 3 Part A To: ling@barklycollege.com Subject: Discussion of Yuko’s case Dear Ling, 1. Discuss the conflict resolution process that you would use to resolve the workplace situation. Conflict is a complexion element of human communication. How we control conflict still, is significant. Conflict controlled indisposed can lead to anRead MoreQuestions On Conflict Management On The Workplace1454 Words   |  6 Pages Conflict Management: How to resolve conflict in the workplace? Mariann Wright Johnson Wales University Introduction Conflict happens in any working relationship and it should not be avoided or ignored. Diversity is the cause of conflict in the workplace because in almost every organization there is different cultures and nationalities, and employees with different experiences, values, beliefs, and opinions. When conflict arises in the workplace it is the manager’s responsibilityRead MoreConflict Is Essential For Organisational Success . In This1135 Words   |  5 PagesConflict is essential for organisational success In this current era of modernization and development, there is a serious economic war between firms of different sizes. Many firms have capabilities to success in the market and maintain their position for a very long period of time. Such firms that keep the hold of the market deals with the organisational conflicts effectively and efficiently (1). It is obvious that one can find different nature of people in a workplace and thus causing conflictsRead MoreConflict in the Workplace1641 Words   |  7 Pagesget along on a daily basis. There’s going to be conflicts in every environment especially in the workplace. Conflict is a typical phenomenon of people’s relationship in workplace. Conflict is a fact of life. Conflict is hard to define because every situation is different in every different workplace. Conflict is a job not easily handled, and it can be really destructive if not properly taken care of. The Webster’s Dictionary (2001) defines conflict as a battle; clash; or a disagreement of ideas,Read MoreConflict in the Workplace675 Words   |  3 PagesConflict in the Workplace Introduction The business world is highly competitive from every perspective; competition for office space, virtual space, markets, customers, clients and with colleagues. It is the responsibility of people working together in their day to day business transactions to have finely tuned interpersonal skills, knowledge and experience to ensure that they achieve the best possible outcomes for themselves and their employers. In environments such as these, conflicts, argumentsRead MoreConflict, Causes, And Effects On The Resolution Of Conflict1613 Words   |  7 PagesConflict retort is a canvass that employers confront at any given time. It demands discreet investigation and correlation to comprehend the narrative of contention and methods to determine them. According to Honeyman (2013), â€Å"workplace conflict includes any type of conflict which takes place within a workplace or among workers and/or managers, potentially including conflict between employees out of work hours.† However, enco unters may be inferred as an agile dispute or a misunderstanding of directives

Thursday, May 14, 2020

A Human Resource Management System Essay - 1905 Words

INTRODUCTION A Human Resources Management System (HRMS) or Human Resources Information System (HRIS) is defined as the computer based systems and processes at the intersection between human resource management (HRM) and information technology. In the article in the World Heritage Encyclopedia noted that â€Å"it merges HRM as a discipline and in particular its basic HR activities and processes with the information technology field, whereas the programming of data processing systems evolved into standardized routines and packages of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software.† John J. Lawler in the article â€Å"Human Recourse Information System† pointed that the HRIS contains tools that allow users to input new data and edit existing data; in addition, such programs provide users with the opportunity to select from an array of predefined reports that may either be printed or displayed on a monitor. Reports may address any of a number of different HRM issues (e.g., succession planning, compensation planning, equal employment opportunity monitoring). HRISs also generally include tools by which users or system administrators may generate ad hoc reports and select specific cases or subsets of cases for display. Firms have experienced increased competitive pressures that have translated into greater cost containment demands from upper management, leading to greater automation of the record-keeping function in the HRM field. The ready availability of microcomputers and relativelyShow MoreRelatedHuman Resource Management Systems : Management1080 Words   |  5 Pages Human Resource Management Systems: Management Through Software Auriel S. Brown Dr. Jack Huddleston HRM520004VA016-1148-001: Hr Information Systems Strayer University 10/26/14 Human Resource Management Systems Human Resource Information Systems or HRSI are systems used to combine task related to the human resource management field. These task include but are not limited to payroll, benefits management, and employment recruitment. Many businesses both large and small haveRead MoreThe Human Resource Management System1234 Words   |  5 Pagesthe main functions of the human resource management system Recruitment and selection are two critical functions of human resource management. Taking into consideration both the capacities the recruitment process goes before the selection capacity. These functions form is basically the core fundamental that engulf the human resource management and includes that of talent acquisition and training and development and even rewards for the employees. For a human resource manager, it’s an importantRead MoreHuman Resource Information System And Human Resources Management System1399 Words   |  6 PagesHRIS, which is also known as a human resource information system or human resource management system (HRMS), is basically an intersection of human resources and information technology through HR software. This allows HR activities and processes to occur electronically. To put it another way, a HRIS may be viewed as a way, through software, for businesses big and small to take care of a number of activities, including those related to human resources, accounting, management, and payroll. A HRIS allowsRead MoreThe Human Resource Management System Essay1392 Words   |  6 Pages which is also known as a human resource information system or human resource management system (HRMS), is basically an intersection of human resources and information technology through HR software. This allows HR activities and processes to occur electronically. To put it another way, a HRIS may be viewed as a way, through software, for businesses big and small to take care of a number of activities, including those related to human resources, accounting, management, and payroll. A HRIS allowsRead MoreHuman Resource Management System1940 Words   |  8 PagesHUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Synopsis [pic] Date of Submission : 18.5.2010 Submitted by: Group No: Read MoreHuman Resources Information System in Management of Human Resources2435 Words   |  10 PagesHuman Resources Information System in Management of Human Resources Contents 1.0 Introduction 2 2.0 Case studies one 2 2.1 Description 2 2.2 Advantages 3 2.3 Challenges 4 2.4 Organizational advantage 4 3.0 Case studies two 5 3.1 Description 5 3.2 Advantages 5 3.3 Challenges 6 3.4 Organizational advantage 7 4.0 Conclusion 7 5.0 References 8 1.0 Introduction In today s corporate world information system has come to play a very criticalRead MoreHuman Resource Management System Implementation947 Words   |  4 PagesUniversity Human Resource Management System Implementation Human Resource Information system (HRIMS), also referred to as Human Resources Management System (HRMS), is a series of integrated systems that is utilized to gather, organize, and analyze information regarding human resources in an organization. This assists in the automation and simplification of an organization’s tasks, but most fundamentally, it aids in the laying down of a framework on which the management of human resource policies canRead MoreHuman Resource Management Information System1731 Words   |  7 PagesStudent Number: 4494931 American Public University System Professor Emilia Butu Human Resource Management Information Systems- HRMT 415 Session D, Summer 2014 3 October 2014â€Æ' Introduction As times change so does the way organizations handle business. As organizations change practices HRM must change to remain an inaugural part of the organization. As a HR Director of a large corporation it is a must to understand Human Resource Information Systems or HRIS. With many HRIS functions such as e-recruitingRead MorePayroll System And The Human Resource Management System2022 Words   |  9 Pages Payroll systems in organizations are often computerized. According to Devansh (2011), payroll systems are usually one of the first systems to be computerized. The system is computerized in order to obtain accurate results and provide information during auditing processes. Employees of the payroll department should be able to view employees data but shouldn’t be able to add, delete or modify the data. The timesheet of employees received from the personnel department can be viewed but should not beRead MoreHuman Resources Information System ( Hrms ) Human Resource Managemen t System2230 Words   |  9 PagesHRIS, which is also known as Human Resources Information System or (HRMS) Human Resource Management System, is actually a hybrid of human resources and information technology by HR software. This allows HR activities and processes to be carried out electronically. Human Resources Information System is a system that can keep track of all your employees and information to keep. It is, as a rule in a database or, more generally carried out in a series of connected databases. These include the name and

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Compare/Contrast Cinderella Essay - 1261 Words

Compare/Contrast Cinderella Essay â€Å"The Walt Disney Company is a powerful economic and cultural phenomenon known throughout the United States and the world as a provider of family entertainment (Maltin, 1, 308). Its media and entertainment holdings establish it as a central communicator in contemporary life. As such, it provides many of the first narratives children use to learn about the world† (Ward, 1). Disney has always been family oriented making it one of the main attractions of reading something Disney. They always have an innocent feeling to their stories, which makes it more appealing for children. But in Vietnamese fairytales a family oriented story may be somewhat gory or violent. â€Å"The stories from Vietnam tell us about their†¦show more content†¦In â€Å"Cinderella† after her stepsisters taunted her about not being able to go to the ball they left her there to keep cleaning and that’s exactly what she did. Until â€Å"a little old woman with a sweet, kind face stood before her. It was her fairy godmother† (Disney, 516). Her fairy godmother started making the magic, turning the pumpkin into the coach, mice into horses, so on and so forth. She never let Cinderella down even when Cinderella had all the transportation she needed she couldn’t showShow MoreRelatedCinderella Compare and Contrast Essay809 Words   |  4 Pagesboth the Grimm version and the Disney version of Cinderella, however the Grimm version definitely exemplifies the theme more effectively than the Disney version does. The Grimm version and the Disney version of Cinderella both include punishment to the stepsisters for how they treated Cinderella and they both exemplify the theme. For example, in both versions, the stepsisters do not get to what they want,which is to marry the prince and for Cinderella not to be happy. The Disney version kept it thisRead MoreGender Stereotypes In Disney1711 Words   |  7 PagesFit What young girl does not dream of becoming a princess and living in a castle happily ever after? Virtually every young girl identifies with princesses and has watched at least one Disney Princess movie. From the first movies of Snow White and Cinderella, to the later movies of The Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast, to the most current movie Moana, Disney Princess movies permeate not only the movie theaters, but also our culture. In fact, â€Å"becoming a princess is as easy as purchasing a tiaraRead MoreComparing Jane Eyre, Cinderella, and Beauty and the Beast1830 Words   |  8 Pagesthoroughly discussed and interpreted, because it holds many captivating elements, such as mystery, passion or even betrayal. The aim of this essay is to analyze the love story between the two protagonists and to illustrate how the elements forming their relationship resemble the ones in fairy tales. Jane Eyre has been often compared to fairy tales such as Cinderella or Beauty and the Beast and I believe that this close connection with the fantastic stories has a huge influence on the relationship betweenRead More Comparing Where Are you going, Where Have You Been and Hills Like White Elephants1320 Words   |  6 PagesAuthors of great stories often use good technical writing skills. The purpose of this essay is to compare and contrast two short stories: Where Are you going, Where Have You Been by Joyce Carol Oates and Hills Like White Elephants by Earnest Hemingway. The comparison and contrast will be done based on their use of plot, point of view and character development. The short story where are you going, where have you been is about a teenage girl who is, vain, self-doubting and affixed in the presentRead MoreRay Bradbury s Fahrenheit 4514443 Words   |  18 Pagesdescribes how Hester gave up everything for Pearl, who becomes her only treasure. Chapter 8 – Hanseldee and Greteldum A work of literarture that reflects a fairytale is Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Harry Potter is in the same situation as Cinderella. With no other family, Harry is forced to live with the Dursley’s. His uncle and aunt spoil their son, Dudley, while neglecting Harry. Harry does the cleaning and is kept away from the public by his family. He is essentially, their whipping boyRead MoreFemale Empowerment in Kate Chopins The Awakening7915 Words   |  32 Pagesinfluence of Adà ¨le Ratignolle. The excessive physical charm of the Creole had first attracted her, for Edna had a sensuous susceptibility to beauty. Then the candor of the woman’s whole existence, which everyone might read, and which formed so striking a contrast to her own habitual reserve [†¦]. Adà ¨le does not only stand for the archetypical Creole woman but for femininity itself as she is also described as â€Å"possessing a more feminine and matronly figure.† Even though Adà ¨le encourages Edna’s awakeningRead MoreFrankenstein Study Guide14107 Words   |  57 Pagesand vows he will end his own life. 2 For the Teacher Frankenstein Study Guide Copyright  © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Media Links Videos Show a film version of the novel as a follow-up to students’ reading. Ask students to compare and contrast the characterizations of the major and minor characters in the film and in the novel. †¢ Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, directed by Kenneth Branagh (Columbia TriStar Home Video, 1995; 123 minutes; Rated R for horrific images). CD-ROMs To giveRead MoreEssay about Happy Endings True Love8166 Words   |  33 Pagesas a whole. -Raymond Bellour (Bellour, 1974, 16) You dont want to be in love - you want to be in love in a movie. -Becky, Sleepless in Seattle Reality and love are almost contradictory to me. -C#233;line, Before Sunset This essay is primarily concerned with the concept of the Hollywood romance happy ending. On a broader scale, it is also concerned with addressing the relationship of these endings to something which (I think it is fair to say) most believe Hollywood seldom attemptsRead MoreMetz Film Language a Semiotics of the Cinema PDF100902 Words   |  316 Pagesconstitute Chapter 5 was first read, and the Festival of the New Cinema (Pesaro, Italy), which organized the round-table discussion during which the last chapter in this volume was originally presented. The idea of bringing together a number of my essays in a single volume, thus making them more easily available, originated with Mikel Dufrenne, Professor at the University of Paris-Nanterre and editor of the series in which this work was published in French. He has my very warm gratitude. C . M. Cannes

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Employee Motivation Strategies used by Royal Bank of Scotland

Question: Discuss about the Employee Motivation Strategies used by Royal Bank of Scotland. Answer: Introduction Organizational success in the currently dynamic business environment is determined by its ability to retain high performance. Among the main drivers of organizational performance is the level of commitment and input that the organizations workforce put into its operational duties. Employee Motivation therefore becomes a very essential aspect that enhances the performance of employees. According to Dobre (2013), numerous studies have shown a positive relationship between employee motivation and high performance output and effectiveness with organizations. This essay analyses a case study on the strategies used to motivate employees at Royal Bank of Scotland System mapping of Royal Bank of Scotland Motivation strategy The Motivational system mapping of Royal Bank of Scotland provides a visual illustration of how the organizational motivation strategies relate to the success of the Bank. RBS offers an integrated that incentive system that features financial and non-financial incentives. The incentive system constitutes of an all-inclusive tactic that seek to motivate the employees across all demographics and levels of company. The system map also show how motivated employees contributes increased organizational efficiency and effectiveness that is necessary to achieve RBS goals. In the closed loop system one finds that as the company succeeds, the RBS staff continue to benefits from the company by providing resources to keep its employees motivated. Fig 1: RBS Motivation Strategy System Map Importance of Motivating employees in an organization Whereas motivation is a process of inducing people to perform, organizations stand to benefit in various aspects from having motivated employees. Firstly, motivation allows the adoption of a positive attitude towards work. As Njambi, (2014) suggests, motivated employees perceive their duties as a sense of self-fulfillment and therefore work at maximum capacity. As a result, a companys workforce will work at full capacity enabling a company to effectively use its human resources. Motivation appeals to the employees personal goals and aligns them to the company vision and objective. Dobre (2013) notes that in doing so, an employee is inspired continuously improve on their performance thereby making the organizational activities efficient. Additionally, by aligning personal goals of the employees to organizational objectives, the employees personal accomplishments translate to achievement of organizational goals. Another vital aspect of motivation is its ability to help retain skilled e mployees in an organization. Numerous studies have shown that motivated employees are less likely to take an alternative job offer since they are satisfied with their current work environment (Leblebici, 2012; Osabiya, 2015; Al Jasmi, 2012). Increased turnover of employees is not only costly to an organization in terms of financial input, but it also affects the overall performance and synergy of its workforce. Analysis of Royal Bank of Scotlands motivation Strategy In a case study evaluating how The Royal Bank of Scotland works to motivate its large workforce, one find that the bank applies an integrated form of strategies and incentives that are well suited to satisfy its employees. At the backdrop of its motivational strategies, The Royal Bank of Scotland applies well established concepts of motivation that inform the variety of strategies its uses. It is worth noting that motivating employees is arguably one of the most complex function of management in an organization, partly because, the human workforces needs are subject to constant changes (Burton, 2012). Additionally, each individual is unique and thereby motivated by different factor compared to the next individual. It is due to such factors that Royal Bank of Scotland adopts a complex motivational strategy that seeks to include variety of incentives that can cover the needs of its large and geo strategically placed workforce. Herzberg Two Factor Theory of evaluating employees motivational needs From the case study, one theoretical approach used by RBS to evaluate the motivational needs of its employees is the Herzberg two factor concept. According to Herzberg as evaluated by Mowali and Babandako (2011), there are two factors informs an employees satisfaction or dissatisfaction. This include Intrinsic (motivation) and extrinsic motivators (hygiene factors) which represent intangible and tangible needs of an individual, respectively. Intrinsic needs entail the emotional needs that motivate an individual such as personal and career development, recognition as well as challenging work experiences. Notably extrinsic motivators include more tangible factors such as monetary benefits, job security and good work environment. Herzberg notes that while the extrinsic factors may not work well in satisfying an employees motivational needs, their lack thereof may dissatisfy the employees thereby reducing the employees morale to work effectively(Mawoli Babandako, 2011). However, conside ring the intrinsic needs of an employee motivates them to perform better. Kuvaas Dysvik (2009) evaluate that in a workplace, growth potential in a professional and personal capacity, recognition and challenging work are some of the main personal drives that could motivate the workforce. In RBS, a Total reward systems that includes both financial and non-financial incentives are applied to cover the wide variety of employee motivation needs. For example, employees get a very inclusive monetary compensation system for their services that includes a basic salary and results based payments such as bonuses and commissions. As added incentives, young employees get student debt pay offs and the older employees have a retirement benefits package. Non-financial incentives cover the personal and professional aspects of employee lives. For instance, the RBS offers training, fosters good relationships with employees, minimal supervision and promotion to positive encourage employees in their professional career. Additionally the bank enriches their personal needs by involving them in Corporate Social Responsibilities, offering paid holidays as well as Recognizing personal achievement within the company. Maslows Hierarchy of needs in RBS Notably, Maslows hierarchy of needs Theory of motivation are notable in RBS Total Reward systems. Maslows needs theory recognizes fives hierarchical stages that define the levels of individual satisfaction, which include psychological, security, belonging, self-esteem and self-actualization needs in their respective order(Mawoli Babandako, 2011). At RBS one finds that the basic salary used to as an incentive to meet psychological needs of an employee while the promise of a life-long career, retirement and medical benefits work to secure their peace of mind. For RBS development of mutually beneficial relationships within the company develops a sense of belonging. Recognition of high achivement raises the employees builds self-esteem whereas Corporate Social Responsibility and professional and personal growth through training and promotions create a sense of self-actualization. Communication and Conflict management as factors of motivating employees There are several other aspects of that allows an organization to keep employees motivated. Among the are active listening and proper communication. As part of the communication process active listening is often overlooked especially by managers. For employees to remain motivate they should be able to voice out their immediate needs and have them addressed within good time. A consequence of in active listening leads to dissatisfaction as well as create ineffectiveness as they perform their duties(Burton, 2012). For RBS creating time for essential feedback form employees through continuous face to face meetings and the approachability of line managers help to continuously and effectively deal with arising employee needs (Yoo, Yoo Lee, 2010). Communication in general is also an aspect that can motivate employees. ineffective communication may frustrate the efforts of employees. In many case managers may abuse their power by assuming to know more than the employees. In such cases, empl oyees find themselves undervalued and hence unmotivated to go the extra mile in performance. Managers should take up supportive and inspiring roles towards their employees in a bid to help them improve their performance(Zhang Bartol, 2010; Stone, Deci Ryan, 2009)). Notably conflict issues are not uncommon in the workplace. Conflict may arise as a result of conflicting roles, duties or ideas. Unaddressed conflicts issue may give rise to low morale at the workplace as well as hostility towards colleagues, which affect the overall performance of a company(Chan, Huang, Ng, 2008). Developing process to manage conflict allows the employees to foster a cohesive relationship with one another also retain employee focus towards achieving company goals. Importance of Applying System Thinking in RBS A system thinking approach in an organization is a vital aspect that evaluates the value of the interconnected elements of that form an organization. Notably, an organization can be viewed as a system in which several independent elements work coherently to achieve a common goal (Meadow, 2008; Jackson, 2009). System thinking therefore allows an organization to recognize and evaluate the relationships among the independent elements of an organization with a view to gain deeper understanding of their Structure to company goals. Ultimately, the overall performance of an organization will depend on the overall function of the organizational structure rather than the independent elements. Therefore, adoption of a system thinking approach allows the management to analyze operational function in isolation so as to determine their effectiveness. The major benefits of applying systems thinking within an organization includes allowing an organization to identify the source of arising issues wi thin a given situation (Flood, 2010;Pourdehnad Bharathy, 2004). By looking at the systemic relationship that surround a particular arising problem, an organization is able to attribute the source of the problem in isolation and thereby implement the requisite measures to solve the issue. In RBS, a system thinking approach helps to map out the structure of the organization to effectively monitor its activities on a global scale. Additionally, one finds that while the company is complex, RBS has the ability to develop an effective operational system that focuses on the banks goals attainment (Mingers White, 2010). For example, the bank has access to individual employee performance and progress which is made possible by putting in place system for motivating employees. The systems include an appraisal processes, Total rewards system, as well as a good communication system across the organizations. Systems thinking in RBS not only helps in monitoring the operations, but it also helps in fostering a cohesive relationship among the banks stakeholders. Effects of unmotivated employees and the Benefits RBS Gains from motivated employees An organization has a lot to lose as a result of demotivated employees. Firstly, if most of the employees are demotivated, there is high likelihood of poor overall performance within an organization. As noted by Dobre (2013), unmotivated employees choose to perform the minimal duties required in their job description. Therefore, poor performance is inevitable in a company where most employees are demotivated. Dissatisfaction is also a likely occurrence among demotivated employees which may lead to high employee turnover as well as fostering an unproductive organizational culture across all levels of management. Poor service delivery is another consequence of demotivated employees(Mawoli Babandako, 2011). For service delivery organizations, the quality of service greatly impacts the customer perception of the company. Poor services quality from demotivated employees reflects poorly on an organization s image and positioning in the market (Leblebici, 2012). Notably, for most business organizations, return on investment is a key objective during its operations. The overall result of the effects of demotivated workers is low revenue. Decreased performance as well as negative brand perception among other inefficiency issues contribute to a reduction in revenue. RBS therefore, gains greatly from maintaining motivated employees. Employees have a drive to acquire new businesses for the organization partly because they gain recognition and results based incentives as a reward for their efforts (Leblebici, 2012; Ganta, 2014). Training facilitates the competency of employees thereby allowing them to better serve RBS. Since RBS is a service business, the motivated employees are more likely to take care of their customer as the organization takes care of their welfare. This emanates from the development of a value-oriented and caring culture at RBS that transcends to all Stakeholder of the bank. Consequently, RBS increases on its performance and operational efficiency, which are vital to retain a competitive edge in the high competitive banking industry. Conclusion Employee Motivation is a central factor to organizational performance and ultimately its ability to achieve goals. In the case study evaluating Royal Bank of Scotlands motivation strategy, one finds that the bank uses a variety of motivation strategy informed by well-established motivation concepts. Concepts such as Herzberg two factor theory helps in determining the motivational needs of employees. Additionally, the Maslows Hierarchy of needs allows RBS to anticipate the needs of its employees that are subject to constant change. RBS adopts a complex yet inclusive motivational strategy not only appeals to intrinsic needs of employees but also the extrinsic needs. References Al Jasmi, S. (2012).A Study on Employees Work Motivation and its Effect on their Performance and Business Productivity(Doctoral dissertation, The British University in Dubai (BUiD)). Burton, K. (2012). A study of motivation: How to get your employees moving.Management,3(2), 232-234. Chan, K. W., Huang, X., Ng, P. M. (2008). Managers conflict management styles and employee attitudinal outcomes: The mediating role of trust.Asia Pacific Journal of Management,25(2), 277-295. Dobre, O. I. (2013). Employee motivation and organizational performance.Journal of Management and Socio-Economic, (1). Flood, R. L. (2010). The relationship of systems thinking to action research.Systemic Practice and Action Research,23(4), 269-284. Ganta, V. C. (2014). Motivation in the workplace to improve the employee performance.International Journal of Engineering Technology,2(6), 221-230. Jackson, M. C. (2009). Fifty years of systems thinking for management.Journal of the Operational Research Society,60(1), S24-S32. Kuvaas, B., Dysvik, A. (2009). Perceived investment in employee development, intrinsic motivation and work performance.Human resource management journal,19(3), 217-236. Leblebici, D. (2012). Impact of workplace quality on employees productivity: case study of a bank in Turkey.Journal of Business, Economics,1(1). Mawoli, M. A., Babandako, A. Y. (2011). An evaluation of staff motivation, dissatisfaction and job performance in an academic setting.Australian Journal of Business and Management Research,1(9), 1. Mingers, J., White, L. (2010). A review of the recent contribution of systems thinking to operational research and management science.European Journal of Operational Research,207(3), 1147-1161. Njambi, C. (2014).Factors influencing employee motivation and its impact on Employee Performance: a case of AMREF health Africa in Kenya(Doctoral dissertation, United States International University-Africa). Osabiya, B. J. (2015). The effect of employees motivation on organizational performance.Journal of public administration and policy research,7(4), 62-75. Pourdehnad, J., Bharathy, G. K. (2004, May). Systems thinking and its implications in organizational transformation. In3rd International Conference on Systems Thinking in Management, Philadelphia, PA. Stone, D. N., Deci, E. L., Ryan, R. M. (2009). Beyond talk: Creating autonomous motivation through self-determination theory.Journal of General Management,34(3), 75. Yoo, M. S., Yoo, I. Y., Lee, H. (2010). Nursing students self-evaluation using a video recording of Foley catheterization: Effects on students competence, communication skills, and learning motivation.Journal of Nursing Education,49(7), 402-405. Zhang, X., Bartol, K. M. (2010). Linking empowering leadership and employee creativity: The influence of psychological empowerment, intrinsic motivation, and creative process engagement.Academy of management journal,53(1), 107-128

Saturday, April 11, 2020

Anarchist Utopia Essays - Philosophy, Political Philosophy, Politics

Anarchist Utopia The world is in turmoil. Wars are fought solely for economic gain, children are shooting their fellow classmates, people are starving, and people are dying. But why is this happening? Why do these things have to happen? Well, they don't have to happen. This is all a result of corrupt governments caring for nothing but money. These governments are sending their own citizens to war, and they do not care who gets killed, just which side wins. This is unjust and must not continue. People think about these things, but do nothing about them, and as the saying goes, silence is consent. By not doing anything about this we allow these things to continue. We allow our governments to murder our family, our friends, and even ourselves. This is why I propose that we begin a new order in which we abandon governments altogether and instate an anarchist system in which all men, women, and children are equal, but in their own way different and unique. Everyone's worth is the same, but their thoughts are different. And this is the ideal society. In order for there to be a true utopia, we need to eliminate a few things. One is government, for as long as there is somebody above us in social status, we can never be truly equal and free. Next are laws made by the common man that not everybody agrees with, for if there are laws that not everybody agrees with, then there is oppression. And lastly, is a monetary system, because as they say, money is the root of all evil. The way that we maintain order in such a society is through a principle called Altruism, which is a principle that states that all people care for each other. Without such a principle, society cannot maintain order, and keep in mind that anarchy is not synonymous with chaos. Anarchy is lack of government, where as chaos is lack of order. Anyway, the reason we need altruism is because, instead of laws, the way that we determine what is right and what is wrong is by determining a persons inherent rights. If a person then violates another person's rights, then that is wrong, and society as a whole punishes that person fittingly. The way that this works is that it's based on the principal of the social contract. The social contract theory states that in order to have protection from a society, you must give up some of your liberties. In this case, the liberties that you would have to give up are the liberties to violate the rights of others, and to intentionally rise in power. These rules are made so as to "weed" out all those who would purposely disrupt the society and dissolve it and also to maintain order in such a system. This also makes it so that only the good natured people would enter. Remember, this society is strictly a voluntary society. No one has to enter if they don't want to and that's one of the best things about the anarchist utopia, is that involvement is entirely voluntary! An education system would be non-existent. Instead of children going to school, each generation is taught by the previous generation. This has been shown to work in indigenous tribes. In the ideal society, where the aforementioned principles are taught, people don't need to work in order to buy material possessions. Instead, the sole motivation to work is to gather the necessities of life (i.e. water, food, shelter, etc...) and each generation would teach what is needed to be known in order to get these things. And that is why education is not necessary in this society. In this society, conflict would be handled in a proper manner, depending on the conflict. For example, if the conflict is about a difference in ideas, the conflict would be settled in a debate-like manner with an audience (whether it be one, or many) that decides who's right. But if the conflict gets to the point of violence, then further action is taken by the society in the form of a tribunal in which the entire society is gathered by either physical means, or through the media, and the society votes as to if the defendant is guilty or innocent and how to punish him/her. The economic system, as I briefly touched on earlier, will be a true socialistic economy. The monetary system will be abolished and all trade will be done only for necessities. Any luxury item that an

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Free Essays on Jesus Treatment of Women

Jesus Treatment of Women In the beginning of Luke 7, according to the NRSV, Jesus enters Capernaum. He has just finished his Sermon on the Plain, and upon his arrival to Capernaum he encounters a Centurion. The Centurion becomes the fleshed-out version of the sermon and he becomes the ironic match for a person of faith. Jesus proceeds to a town called Nain with a great procession, his disciples and a large crowd of followers. As he approached the town a dead man was being taken out. He was the son of a widow and he was her only child. Jesus felt compassion for her and touched the man and commanded him to rise. Once the boy sat up and began to speak, the word about Jesus began to spread all throughout Judea. The people glorified God saying â€Å"A great prophet has risen among us!† John hears of Jesus and summons his disciples to speak to the Lord. Jesus vindicates John and some time thereafter in Luke 7: 36-50 Jesus is asked by Simon a Pharisee to eat with him. Jesus obliges and joins Simo n for a dinner banquet (Keener 208). After taking his place at the dinner table a woman from the city brought a jar of ointment and stood behind Jesus’ feet. She began to bathe Jesus’ feet with her tears and dried them with her hair. As she continued kissing and anointing the feet of Jesus, Simon the Pharisee, probably among many others, began to ask himself, â€Å"If this man were a prophet, he would have known who and what kind of woman this is who is touching him-that she is a sinner (NSRV).† Jesus tells Simon a parable about a creditor who canceled the debts of two debtors whom couldn’t pay, one who owed 500 denarii and the other who owed 50. Jesus asks Simon which debtor will love the creditor more. Simon replies, â€Å"I suppose the one with the greater debt (NRSV).† After judging rightly Jesus turns to the woman and reminds Simon that he didn’t give him water for his feet, he didn’t offer him a kiss, and didn’... Free Essays on Jesus Treatment of Women Free Essays on Jesus Treatment of Women Jesus Treatment of Women In the beginning of Luke 7, according to the NRSV, Jesus enters Capernaum. He has just finished his Sermon on the Plain, and upon his arrival to Capernaum he encounters a Centurion. The Centurion becomes the fleshed-out version of the sermon and he becomes the ironic match for a person of faith. Jesus proceeds to a town called Nain with a great procession, his disciples and a large crowd of followers. As he approached the town a dead man was being taken out. He was the son of a widow and he was her only child. Jesus felt compassion for her and touched the man and commanded him to rise. Once the boy sat up and began to speak, the word about Jesus began to spread all throughout Judea. The people glorified God saying â€Å"A great prophet has risen among us!† John hears of Jesus and summons his disciples to speak to the Lord. Jesus vindicates John and some time thereafter in Luke 7: 36-50 Jesus is asked by Simon a Pharisee to eat with him. Jesus obliges and joins Simo n for a dinner banquet (Keener 208). After taking his place at the dinner table a woman from the city brought a jar of ointment and stood behind Jesus’ feet. She began to bathe Jesus’ feet with her tears and dried them with her hair. As she continued kissing and anointing the feet of Jesus, Simon the Pharisee, probably among many others, began to ask himself, â€Å"If this man were a prophet, he would have known who and what kind of woman this is who is touching him-that she is a sinner (NSRV).† Jesus tells Simon a parable about a creditor who canceled the debts of two debtors whom couldn’t pay, one who owed 500 denarii and the other who owed 50. Jesus asks Simon which debtor will love the creditor more. Simon replies, â€Å"I suppose the one with the greater debt (NRSV).† After judging rightly Jesus turns to the woman and reminds Simon that he didn’t give him water for his feet, he didn’t offer him a kiss, and didn’...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Prejudice Based on Skin Color Dissertation Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

Prejudice Based on Skin Color - Dissertation Example However, after the expression of the skin color through genetics, external factors, for example, ultra-violet rays from the sun may change the skin color away from its initial genetic expression. Distance from the equator is also another external factor that affects the skin color. Even though the non-genetic factors have an effect on the skin color, it is important to note that the effect of genes overrides them all (Kontopoulou and Marketos). This is because the expression caused by the gene is irreversible as compared to that on non-genetic factors. The light skin has always been favored over the dark skin across the various human cultures throughout history. This is because light skin has always been associated with beauty, intelligence and grace while the dark skin has always been considered to be inferior, uncivilized and subordinate (Dovidio and Gaertner). This view was later entrenched in the general psyche by the unfortunate tragedies of slavery and colonialism of the dark-s kinned people by the light skinned people throughout the work in the 19th and 20th centuries. This legacy has perpetuated the view of the superiority of the light skin over the dark skin into the modern times. During slavery era, the lighter skinned black slaves were favored by their masters over their darker skinned counterparts because they were perceived to be more intelligent, co-operative and beautiful as contrasted with darker skinned slaves who were considered ugly, uncivilized and crude (Sulem et al.).